//Rebecca Allen

About Rebecca Allen

Rebecca Allen is an associate research fellow, having led FFT Education Datalab from its launch in February 2015 to January 2018. She is an expert in the analysis of large scale administrative and survey datasets, including the National Pupil Database and School Workforce Census. In January 2018 she took up a position as a professor at the UCL Institute of Education, leading the Centre for Education Improvement Science.

Provisional KS4 data 2017: North East secondary schools fall further behind the rest of the country

Last year at the Schools NorthEast Annual Summit I was delighted to talk to primary teachers and learn how they had become a high-performing region. Today I had less happy conversation with their secondary colleagues about why they are falling behind at GCSE. As the chart below shows, the North East has always scored poorly [...]

By |2017-10-18T18:06:46+00:0012th October 2017|Exams and assessment, School accountability|

GCSE results day 2017: It’s all about the (lack of) money, money, money

In England, the government has been trying to push schools into raising entries in the so-called EBacc subjects through its accountability metrics: the percentage entering and achieving the EBacc, and Progress 8. This is one reason why subject entries have been changing so much in recent years. However, another reason why they are changing is [...]

By |2017-12-13T19:12:12+00:0024th August 2017|Exams and assessment, School accountability|

A-Level results day 2017: The impact of reform in England and Wales

A massive 59% of A-Level exams sat in England this year were in reformed subjects which follow the new, linear model of sitting one set of exams at the end of the two-year course. Overall, and perhaps surprisingly, A-Level entries by 18-year-olds in reformed subjects increased by 2.3% in England. This compares to 0.7% in [...]

By |2018-09-27T17:34:43+00:0017th August 2017|Exams and assessment, Post-16 provision|

How many language teachers would we need to reach the Conservatives’ 75% EBacc target?

The Conservatives’ manifesto has revised the party’s commitment to require all students to study the English Baccalaureate subjects at Key Stage 4. It now has a more modest proposal that 75% of students should study the EBacc by the end of the next parliament [PDF]. To be considered to have entered the EBacc a child [...]

Load More Posts